Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 407

Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter. This is issue #407 for the week March 2 – 8, 2015, and the full version is available here.

In this issue we cover:

The issue of The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter is brought to you by:

  • Paul White
  • Elizabeth K. Joseph
  • Aaron Honeycutt
  • And many others

If you have a story idea for the Weekly Newsletter, join the Ubuntu News Team mailing list and submit it. Ideas can also be added to the wiki!

Except where otherwise noted, content in this issue is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License BY SA Creative Commons License

Interview with Michael Hall (mhall119) of the Ubuntu Community Council

The Ubuntu Community Council is the primary community (i.e., non-technical) governance body for the Ubuntu project. In this series of 7 interviews, we go behind the scenes with the community members who were elected in 2013 serve on this council with Mark Shuttleworth.

In this, our fourth interview, we talk with Michael Hall about the LoCo work that got him involved with Ubuntu, his role at Canonical and great advice he has for new contributors.

mhall

What do you do for a career?

I am a Community Manager at Canonical, which essentially means it’s my job to make sure that we, as a company, are providing all of the information, tools, and resources to our community that they need to positively contribute to the Ubuntu project.

What was your first computing experience?

When I was about 10 years old, my family got a beige-box 33MHz 386 running MS DOS. This was my into to the world of computing, and where I learned about the command line and batch scripting. By the time we upgraded to a 66MHz 486, I was already confidently poking every nook and cranny of a computer.

How long have you been involved with Ubuntu? And how long on the Ubuntu Community Council?

I became involved in the Ubuntu community through the Florida LoCo Team, going to local meetups and participating online. From that I got involved in the LoCo Team Portal, which at the time needed a way to register and track team events. Since I was employed as a web developer at the time, it was a perfect match for me. This introduced me not only to the wider Ubuntu community, but also the tools of Ubuntu’s distributed development, as well as the governance bodies like the LoCo Council.

I was elected to the Community Council a little over a year ago, and that time has been both challenging and rewarding.

What are some of the projects you’ve worked on in Ubuntu over the years?

Most of my contributions have been towards web projects, especially the LoCo Team Portal and Summit projects. I was first employed at Canonical as a web developer, and only later moved over to the Community team.

What is your focus in Ubuntu today?

Given my position as Community Manager, there’s not a clear distinction between what I do as an employee and what I do as a community member. I still occasionally contribute to web projects (Summit mostly), and actively participate in as many parts of the community as I can.

Do you contribute to other free/open source projects? Which ones?

My contributions are mostly small, drive-by contributions these days. The beauty of open source is that it’s possible (and when done right, easy) to jump in and make a fix to a project you’ve not been involved with before. I’ve submitted everything from patches to kernel drivers to support USB microscopes, to Debian packages for Python libraries.

If you were to give a newcomer some advice about getting involved with Ubuntu, what would it be?

The best advice I can give is to just start doing something. You don’t need anybody’s permission, and you don’t need anybody to tell you what to do. Just find something you like, that you think you can make better, and make it better. This can by anything, code, documentation, translations, artwork, etc. Your first contribution is always going to be the hardest, so don’t get frustrated if things don’t all go smoothly, you’ll learn from it and it’ll be easier next time. And remember that no contribution is too small or unimportant, everything has value and is appreciated.

Do you have any other comments else you wish to share with the community?

The Ubuntu community is more than just a technology group, it’s made up of more than just hackers and elite technophiles. We have all kinds of people here, and we welcome all kinds of people here. Prepare to make friends, long lasting friends. I’ve met people through the community that I am and will remain friends with outside of it. Some of them are like family to me now. That’s part of what makes our community so amazing. Embrace it.

New to this series? Check out our previous two Community Council interviews:

DMB [Developer Membership Board] election results

The DMB election results are now in: http://civs.cs.cornell.edu/cgi-bin/results.pl?id=E_7ce24ee3e589e440

Those have been reviewd by the DMB and accepted during our latest meeting.

This results in Benjamin Drung leaving the board and Mathieu Trudel-Lapierre taking his seat.

Scott Kitterman, Iain Lane and myself get to stand on the board for another 2 years term.

With my TB hat on, I’ll now take care of implementing the required changes (Launchpad, mailing-list and IRC ACLs).

The DMB would like to thank Benjamin for all these years of good service to the DMB and welcome Mathieu as its latest member!

Originally posted to the technical-board mailing list on Mon Mar 2 19:35:52 UTC 2015 by Stéphane Graber

Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 406

Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter. This is issue #406 for the week February 23 – March 1, 2015, and the full version is available here.

In this issue we cover:

The issue of The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter is brought to you by:

  • Paul White
  • Ian Nicholson
  • Elizabeth K. Joseph
  • Mary Frances Hull
  • And many others

If you have a story idea for the Weekly Newsletter, join the Ubuntu News Team mailing list and submit it. Ideas can also be added to the wiki!

Except where otherwise noted, content in this issue is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License BY SA Creative Commons License

Vivid Vervet Beta 1 Released

The first Beta of the Vivid Vervet (to become 15.04) has now been released!

Pre-releases of the Vivid Vervet are *not* encouraged for anyone needing a stable system or anyone who is not comfortable running into occasional, even frequent breakage. They are, however, recommended for Ubuntu flavour developers and those who want to help in testing, reporting and fixing bugs as we work towards getting this release ready.

Beta 1 includes a number of software updates that are ready for wider testing. This is quite an early set of images, so you should expect some bugs.

While these Beta 1 images have been tested and work, except as noted in the release notes, Ubuntu developers are continuing to improve the Vivid Vervet. In particular, once newer daily images are available, system installation bugs identified in the Beta 1 installer should be verified against the current daily image before being reported in Launchpad. Using an obsolete image to re-report bugs that have already been fixed wastes your time and the time of developers who are busy trying to make 15.04 the best Ubuntu release yet. Always ensure your system is up to date before reporting bugs.

This Beta features images for Kubuntu, Lubuntu, Ubuntu GNOME, UbuntuKylin, Ubuntu Mate, Xubuntu and the Ubuntu Cloud images.

Kubuntu

Kubuntu uses KDE software and now features the new Plasma 5 desktop.

The Beta 1 images can be downloaded at:

http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/kubuntu/releases/vivid/beta-1

More information on Kubuntu Beta 1 can be found here:

https://wiki.ubuntu.com/VividVervet/Beta1/Kubuntu

Lubuntu

Lubuntu is a flavour of Ubuntu based on LXDE and focused on providing a very lightweight distribution.

The Beta 1 images can be downloaded at:

http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/lubuntu/releases/vivid/beta-1

Ubuntu GNOME

Ubuntu GNOME is a flavour of Ubuntu featuring the GNOME desktop environment.Vivid Vervet Beta 1 Released

The Beta 1 images can be downloaded at:

http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/ubuntu-gnome/releases/vivid/beta-1

More information on Ubuntu GNOME Beta 1 can be found here:

https://wiki.ubuntu.com/VividVervet/Beta1/UbuntuGNOME

UbuntuKylin

UbuntuKylin is a flavour of Ubuntu that is more suitable for Chinese users.

The Beta 1 images can be downloaded at:

http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/ubuntukylin/releases/vivid/beta-1

More information on UbuntuKylin Beta 1 can be found here:

https://wiki.ubuntu.com/VividVervet/Beta1/UbuntuKylin

Ubuntu Mate

Ubuntu Mate is a flavour of Ubuntu featuring the Mate desktop environment.

The Beta 1 images can be downloaded at:

http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/ubuntu-mate/releases/vivid/beta-1

More information on Ubuntu Mate Beta 1 can be found here:

https://ubuntu-mate.org/blog/ubuntu-mate-vivid-beta1/

Xubuntu

Xubuntu is a flavour of Ubuntu shipping with the XFCE desktop environment.

The Beta 1 images can be downloaded at:

http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/xubuntu/releases/vivid/beta-1

More information on Xubuntu Beta-1 can be found here:

http://xubuntu.org/news/xubuntu-15-04-beta-1/

Ubuntu Cloud

Ubuntu Cloud images can be run on Amazon EC2, Openstack, SmartOS and many other clouds.

The Beta 1 images can be downloaded at:

http://cloud-images.ubuntu.com/releases/vivid/beta-1/

Regular daily images for Ubuntu can be found at:

http://cdimage.ubuntu.com

If you’re interested in following the changes as we further develop Vivid, we suggest that you subscribe to the ubuntu-devel-announce list. This is a low-traffic list (a few posts a week) carrying announcements of approved specifications, policy changes, alpha and beta releases and other interesting events.

http://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-devel-announce

A big thank you to the developers and testers for their efforts to pull together this Beta release!

Originally posted to the ubuntu-devel-announce mailing list on Thu Feb 26 19:30:02 UTC 2015 by Elfy, on behalf of the Ubuntu release team.

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