Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 412

Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter. This is issue #412 for the week April 6 – 12, 2015, and the full version is available here.

In this issue we cover:

The issue of The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter is brought to you by:

  • Paul White
  • Elizabeth K. Joseph
  • Paul Mellors
  • Aaron Honeycutt
  • And many others

If you have a story idea for the Weekly Newsletter, join the Ubuntu News Team mailing list and submit it. Ideas can also be added to the wiki!

Except where otherwise noted, content in this issue is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License BY SA Creative Commons License

Interview with Elizabeth K. Joseph of the Ubuntu Community Council

The Ubuntu Community Council is the primary community (i.e., non-technical) governance body for the Ubuntu project. In this series of 7 interviews, we go behind the scenes with the community members who were elected in 2013 serve on this council with Mark Shuttleworth.

In this, our sixth interview, we talk with Elizabeth K. Joseph who shares some details about her systems administration work, and efforts with the Ubuntu News Team, local Ubuntu teams, Xubuntu and more.

ekjoseph

What do you do for a career?

I work as a systems administrator and frequently write and speak about my work in that role. My current position is with HP on the OpenStack Project Infrastructure where we maintain dozens of static systems that developers interface with for their work on OpenStack and a fleet of hundreds of worker servers that run all of the tests that are done against the code before it’s merged. This infrastructure is fully open source, with all of our system configurations, Puppet tooling and projects we used available via git here. Since I have a passion for both systems administration and open source, it’s been quite the dream job for me as I work with colleagues from around the world, across several companies.

What was your first computing experience?

In 1991, when I was 10 years old, my uncle gave our family an IBM PC that was as old as I was. DOS-only, I spent hours writing stories on WordPerfect and playing games from 5.25″ floppy disks. In 1993 we got a system that had a graphical interface and that’s when I inherited the old IBM for personal use and really got to digging around into the guts of that old system and breaking things. Throughout my teenage years my interest in computers grew and I found myself buying really cheap old hardware at garage sales so I could play around with it.

How long have you been involved with Ubuntu? And how long on the Ubuntu Community Council?

I first started using Ubuntu in March of 2005, which I only know because that’s when I also created my ubuntuforums.org account for asking a question about the laptop I was installing it on. Involvement began in early 2006 when I got involved with Ubuntu Women to help with the website and to consolidate resources from the officially recognized project (mailing list, web site) and the earlier created resources (forums, IRC channel). In 2007 I got involved with Ubuntu Pennsylvania where we did everything from release parties to working with local organizations to deploy Ubuntu on recycled computers for non-profits.

I joined the Community Council in 2009, so it’s been nearly 6 years! It’s been an amazing opportunity to play an important role in our community where we work with all kinds of teams I wouldn’t normally be exposed to. I highly recommend to others that they apply for a position on the council when elections for the next two year term come up in the fall.

What are some of the projects you’ve worked on in Ubuntu over the years?

I’ve done a lot of work with LoCos over the years, first in Pennsylvania and now in California, where I served as part of the leadership team for a few years. I spent several years working on Ubuntu Classroom, which has now been largely replaced by video-based Q&A sessions and tutorials, but were valuable to the community when we were more text chat focused. The work with Ubuntu Women was a pretty major part of my work for a long time, as we sought to encourage more women to get involved with Ubuntu through online events, giveaways, informal mentoring and general social support. I also served on the Ubuntu Membership Board for 4 years, which was a really valuable and inspiring experience for getting to know some of our latest, strong contributors.

What is your focus in Ubuntu today?

I host local events for Ubuntu California, including monthly Ubuntu Hours when I’m in town and events like the Ubuntu Global Jam back in February where we brought together local folks for doing Quality Assurance testing on the latest ISOs for Xubuntu. I also give talks about Ubuntu or Xubuntu, typically focused on getting involved or features about the latest releases. I also am the lead editor for the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter which collects news from around our community and around the world about Ubuntu for publishing each Monday – it sure keeps me busy! Finally, I’m the Marketing lead for Xubuntu, so I manage relationships with companies who provide stickers and shirts for our community, help coordinate giveaways, make sure project announcements reach our broader community and manage our social media accounts.

Do you contribute to other free/open source projects? Which ones?

Since my actual day job is working on OpenStack, OpenStack is a big one! And where the vast majority of my code and infrastructure commits are these days. Over the years I’ve also contributed to Debian and various patches to small projects like BitlBee. I’m very fortunate to have always had employers who encourage open source contributions, so it’s been easy for me to continue contributions as my career has evolved.

If you were to give a newcomer some advice about getting involved with Ubuntu, what would it be?

Jump right in! The Ubuntu Community Portal has extensive documentation for various parts of the project you can get involved with based on your interest and expertise. From tasks that anyone can do, regardless of technical expertise, to more specialized ones, the site gives an overview of resources and links to more if you find something you’re interested in. Also, don’t be afraid to ask for help.

I gave a talk last year about five specific places to get involved, which you can read about here. You can check out extended slides (pdf) for a ten ways to get involved talk I gave with Nicholas Skaggs at Fossetcon back in September.

Do you have any other comments else you wish to share with the community?

Shameless plug: The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter always needs volunteers! We need folks who can write short summaries for articles and do editorial review, so drop me a line at lyz@ubuntu.com if you’re interested and I can get you details.

New to this series? Check out our previous Community Council interviews:

Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 411

Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter. This is issue #411 for the week March 30 – April 5 , 2015, and the full version is available here.

In this issue we cover:

The issue of The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter is brought to you by:

  • Paul White
  • Elizabeth K. Joseph
  • And many others

If you have a story idea for the Weekly Newsletter, join the Ubuntu News Team mailing list and submit it. Ideas can also be added to the wiki!

Except where otherwise noted, content in this issue is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License BY SA Creative Commons License

Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 410

Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter. This is issue #410 for the week March 23 – 29, 2015, and the full version is available here.

In this issue we cover:

The issue of The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter is brought to you by:

  • Paul White
  • Elizabeth K. Joseph
  • Aaron Honeycutt
  • And many others

If you have a story idea for the Weekly Newsletter, join the Ubuntu News Team mailing list and submit it. Ideas can also be added to the wiki!

Except where otherwise noted, content in this issue is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License BY SA Creative Commons License

Ubuntu 15.04 (Vivid Vervet) Final Beta released

The Ubuntu team is pleased to announce the final beta release of Ubuntu 15.04 Desktop, Server, Cloud, and Core products.

Codenamed "Vivid Vervet", 15.04 continues Ubuntu’s proud tradition of integrating the latest and greatest open source technologies into a high-quality, easy-to-use Linux distribution. The team has been hard at work through this cycle, introducing new features and fixing bugs.

This beta release includes images from not only the Ubuntu Desktop, Server, Cloud, and Core products, but also the Kubuntu, Lubuntu, Ubuntu GNOME, Ubuntu Kylin, Ubuntu Studio and Xubuntu flavours. In addition to the usual suspects, we’re also welcoming a new flavour to the family this cycle with Ubuntu MATE.

The beta images are known to be reasonably free of showstopper CD build or installer bugs, while representing a very recent snapshot of 15.04 that should be representative of the features intended to ship with the final release expected on April 23rd, 2015.

There are, however, two bugs in this beta serious enough that it’s worth calling them out in the release announcement. Both bugs affect all flavours, are considered high priority, and will be addressed in upcoming daily builds:

  1. After installation is complete, clicking the "reboot now" button will eject your installation medium but then fail to reboot. The simple workaround for this is to manually turn off or reset your computer and then boot into the freshly installed system.
  2. When doing an OEM installation, the OEM user will not be removed at the end of the prepare-to-ship phase. Because of this, it is not recommended that oem-config be used with this beta, except for testing purposes.

Ubuntu, Ubuntu Server, Ubuntu Core, Cloud Images

Utopic Final Beta includes updated versions of most of our core set of packages, including a current 3.19.2 kernel, the much-anticipated switch to systemd, and much more.

To upgrade to Ubuntu 15.04 Final Beta from Ubuntu 14.10, follow these instructions:

https://help.ubuntu.com/community/VividUpgrades

The Ubuntu 15.04 Final Beta images can be downloaded at:

http://releases.ubuntu.com/15.04/ (Ubuntu and Ubuntu Server)

Additional images can be found at the following links:

The full release notes for Ubuntu 15.04 Final Beta can be found at:

https://wiki.ubuntu.com/VividVervet/ReleaseNotes

Kubuntu

Kubuntu is the KDE based flavour of Ubuntu. It uses the Plasma desktop and includes a wide selection of tools from the KDE project.

The Final Beta images can be downloaded at:

http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/kubuntu/releases/15.04/beta-2/

More information on Kubuntu Final Beta can be found here:

https://wiki.ubuntu.com/VividVervet/Beta2/Kubuntu

Lubuntu

Lubuntu is a flavor of Ubuntu that targets to be lighter, less resource hungry and more energy-efficient by using lightweight applications and LXDE, The Lightweight X11 Desktop Environment, as its default GUI.

The Final Beta images can be downloaded at:

http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/lubuntu/releases/15.04/beta-2/

More information on Lubuntu Final Beta can be found here:

https://wiki.ubuntu.com/VividVervet/Beta2/Lubuntu

Ubuntu GNOME

Ubuntu GNOME is a flavor of Ubuntu featuring the GNOME desktop environment.

The Final Beta images can be downloaded at:

http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/ubuntu-gnome/releases/15.04/beta-2/

More information on Ubuntu GNOME Final Beta can be found here:

https://wiki.ubuntu.com/VividVervet/Beta2/UbuntuGNOME

UbuntuKylin

UbuntuKylin is a flavor of Ubuntu that is more suitable for Chinese users.

The Final Beta images can be downloaded at:

http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/ubuntukylin/releases/15.04/beta-2/

More information on UbuntuKylin Final Beta can be found here:

https://wiki.ubuntu.com/VividVervet/Beta2/UbuntuKylin

Ubuntu MATE

Ubuntu MATE is a flavor of Ubuntu featuring the MATE desktop environment.

The Final Beta images can be downloaded at:

http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/ubuntu-mate/releases/15.04/beta-2/

More information on UbuntuMATE Final Beta can be found here:

https://wiki.ubuntu.com/VividVervet/Beta2/UbuntuMATE

Ubuntu Studio

Ubuntu Studio is a flavor of Ubuntu that provides a full range of multimedia content creation applications for each key workflows: audio, graphics, video, photography and publishing.

The Final Beta images can be downloaded at:

http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/ubuntustudio/releases/15.04/beta-2/

Xubuntu

Xubuntu is a flavor of Ubuntu that comes with Xfce, which is a stable, light and configurable desktop environment.

The Final Beta images can be downloaded at:

http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/xubuntu/releases/15.04/beta-2/

Regular daily images for Ubuntu can be found at:

http://cdimage.ubuntu.com

Ubuntu is a full-featured Linux distribution for clients, servers and clouds, with a fast and easy installation and regular releases. A tightly-integrated selection of excellent applications is included, and an incredible variety of add-on software is just a few clicks away.

Professional technical support is available from Canonical Limited and hundreds of other companies around the world. For more information about support, visit http://www.ubuntu.com/support

If you would like to help shape Ubuntu, take a look at the list of ways you can participate at: http://www.ubuntu.com/community/participate

Your comments, bug reports, patches and suggestions really help us to improve this and future releases of Ubuntu. Instructions can be found at: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/ReportingBugs

You can find out more about Ubuntu and about this beta release on our website, IRC channel and wiki.

To sign up for future Ubuntu announcements, please subscribe to Ubuntu’s very low volume announcement list at:

http://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-announce

Originally posted to the ubuntu-announce mailing list on Fri Mar 27 01:01:04 UTC 2015 by Adam Conrad, on behalf of the Ubuntu Release Team,

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